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About the Partnership (Who We Are)

Community-University Research Alliance (CURA): 
The Research Alliance for Children with Special Needs (RACSN)

 

The Research Alliance for Children with Special Needs Gillian King
(Director of RACSN)

Marilyn Kertoy, 
Jacqueline Specht, 
and Melissa Currie
(RACSN Investigators)
 
About this Partnership: The Research Alliance for Children with Special Needs (RACSN) is a partnership of researchers from the fields of education, health, social services, and academia. RACSN is led by a community-based research program located at Thames Valley Children's Centre, and partnered with two local school boards, two social service agencies, and the University of Western Ontario. RACSN addresses the issue of enhancing children's participation through an integrated research program bridging research and practice. The Alliance is based on an infrastructure model. RACSN provided the necessary structure and organizational support to allow partner groups to pool their energies, skills, and knowledge to provide a concerted and coordinated research, dissemination, and training effort.

http://www.racsn.ca

CURA: Partnerships in Capacity Building, Housing, Community Economic Development and Psychiatric Survivors

 

Partnerships in Capacity Building, Housing, Community Economic Development and Psychiatric Survivors Cheryl Forchuk, Academic Director
About this Partnership: In this CURA, researchers, social service professionals, community volunteers, as well as individuals who have experienced mental health challenges, collaborate on a number of related projects to evaluate existing models of supported housing. This CURA has developed a template which seeks to explore and understand which type of housing works best for whom, and improve placement success. This participatory approach to research will give a real voice to a marginalized constituency, enabling them to share their insights and opinions with community and academic partners and to develop working relationships within their own community as well as between consumer, social agency, professional, and academic communities.

http://publish.uwo.ca/~cforchuk/cura/index.htm

CURA: Youth Lifestyle Choices - Enhancement of Youth Resiliency and Reduction of Harmful Behaviours Leading to Healthy Lifestyle Choices (YLC-CURA)

 

Enhancement of Youth Resiliency and Reduction of Harmful Behaviours Leading to Healthy Lifestyle Choices (YLC-CURA)

Teena Willoughby and Heather Chalmers
(Co-Directors of YLC-CURA)

About this Partnership: The YLC-CURA is a long-term strategic partnership between a number of Brock University faculty and Niagara community agencies to better understand resilience and youth lifestyle choices. By examining factors that enhance resilience, the team will focus on minimizing risk behaviours to a responsible moderate level while protecting youth from adverse consequences. By promoting health rather than limiting risk, the focus will be on all youth so that strategies and interventions can encourage positive lifestyle choices for all. The YLC-CURA is unequivocally committed to ensuring that all its members have the opportunity to fully participate and influence its direction and work.

http://www.brocku.ca/cura/

Partnership: Therapeutic Relationships from Hospital to Community - Implementation of Evidence Based Practice

 

Therapeutic Relationships from Hospital to Community - Implementation of Evidence Based Practice Cheryl Forchuk, Project's Principal Investigator
About this Partnership: This four-year, $930,000 study is testing a new approach to supporting people with chronic mental illness as they make the transition from the hospital to the community. It involves 380 discharged patients from Regional Mental Health Care London/St. Thomas (formally known as London/St. Thomas Psychiatric Hospital), the Centre for Mountain Health Care, St. Joseph's Health Care, Hamilton (formally known as Hamilton Psychiatric Hospital) and the Whitby Mental Health Centre. The overall objective of this study is to assist individuals hospitalized with a chronic mental illness in successful community living. The specific objectives are to determine the cost and effectiveness of a transitional discharge model of care, and compare it to the standard model of discharge. The transitional model focuses on interpersonal relationships.

http://publish.uwo.ca/~cforchuk/tr/index.htm

Partnership: The CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research

 

The CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research
 
Mary Law and Peter Rosenbaum
(Co-Directors of CanChild)
About this Partnership: The CanChild Centre for Childhood Disability Research is a Health System-Linked Research Unit funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health. The Centre is sponsored by McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation in Hamilton. CanChild is a multi-disciplinary team whose mandate is to conduct high quality research in the area of childhood disability. A major goal of the unit is to foster the transfer of research findings into clinical practice. The Research programs at CanChild concentrate on children and youth with disabilities and their families within the context of the communities in which they live. CanChild's focus is on the interrelationships between individuals, their families, communities, and health systems. The focus of research conducted by CanChild is broad, and includes children and youth with physical, developmental, and/or communicative needs who require rehabilitation services, as well as their families.

http://www.canchild.ca