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Journal Articles

A Model of Impacts of Research Partnerships in Health and Social Services.

Abstract

Alliances have long been an important strategy for health promotion and community development. They are now becoming an important approach to generating research that is thought to have real-world relevance and easy applicability because of the involvement of community members. A comprehensive, dynamic model of community impacts of research partnerships in social or health services is presented. This process-oriented, systems model outlines three major domains of mid-term impact (Enhanced Knowledge, Enhanced Research Skills, and Use of Information) that correspond to the core functions of collaborative research partnerships discussed in the literature (i.e. knowledge generation, research education and training, and knowledge sharing). The model will assist research partners, intended recipients, and funders to understand and evaluate the real-world impacts of community-university research partnerships. The model provides research partnerships with a tool to demonstrate their accountability and to improve their operations and impacts, and evaluators with a tool to guide planning and evaluation efforts.

Reference

Currie, M., King, G., Rosenbaum, P., Law, M., Kertoy, M., & Specht, J. (2005). A model of impacts of research partnerships in health and social services. Evaluation and Program Planning, 28, 400-412.

A Measure of Community Membersí Perceptions of the Impacts of Research Partnerships in Health and Social Services

Abstract

Currently, there are no psychometrically sound outcome measures by which to assess the impacts of research partnerships. This article describes the development of a 33-item, survey questionnaire measuring community members’ perceptions of the impact of research partnerships addressing health and social issues. The Community Impacts of Research Oriented Partnerships (CIROP) was developed using information from the literatures on health promotion, community development, research utilization, and community-based participatory research, and from focus groups involving 29 key informants. Data from 174 community members were used to determine the factor structure, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability of the four CIROP scales, and to provide evidence of construct validity. The CIROP informs research partnerships about the extent of their impact in the areas of Personal Knowledge Development, Personal Research Skill Development, Organizational/Group Access To and Use of Information, and Community and Organizational Development, allowing them to demonstrate accountability to funding bodies. As well, the CIROP can be used as a research tool to assess the effectiveness of knowledge sharing approaches, determine the most influential activities of research partnerships, and determine structural characteristics of partnerships associated with various types of impact. The CIROP provides a better understanding of community members’ perspectives and expectations of research partnerships, with important implications for knowledge transfer and uptake.

Reference

King, G., Servais, M., Kertoy, M., Specht, J., Currie, M., Rosenbaum, P., Law, M., Forchuk, C., Chalmers, H., & Willoughby, T. (2009). A measure of community members’ perceptions of the impacts of research partnerships in health and social services. Evaluation and Program Planning, 32, 289-299.

Features and Impacts of Five Multidisciplinary Community-University Research Partnerships

Abstract

Despite the increasing number of multidisciplinary community-university research partnerships to address real-world issues, little is known about their nature. This article describes the features and impacts of five research partnerships addressing health or social service issues, which constituted a convenience cample from the province of Ontario, Canada. The article describes their characteristics, ways of operating, outputs, types of requests received from community members, and mid-term impacts. Requests directed to partnerships were tracked over a 10-month period in 2003 to 2004, using a research contact checklist, and 174 community members later completed an impact questionnaire capturing perceptions of the impacts of the partnerships on personal knowledge and research skill development, organisational/group access to and use of information, and community and organizational development. The data indicated that partnerships had similar priorities and magnitudes of mid-term impacts, yet differed in the scope of their partnering, realm of intended influence and the number of mechanisms used to engage and communicate with target audiences. The partnerships produced different types of outputs and received different types of requests from community members. The findings inform researchers about partnership diversity and help to establish more realistic expectations about the magnitude of partnerships’ impacts.

Reference

King, G., Servais, M., Forchuk, C., Chalmers, H., Currie, M., Law, M., Specht, J., Rosenbaum, P., Willoughby, T., & Kertoy, M. (2009, in press). Features and impacts of five multidisciplinary community-university research partnerships. Health and Social Care in the Community, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2524.2009.00874.x.

Easy-To-Read Summaries

King, G., & Currie, M. (2002). Why study the impact of research oriented partnerships? Backgrounder: Information about the Impact Study. London, ON: Research Alliance for Children with Special Needs.
 
Backgrounder: Information About the Impact Study [157kb PDF]

Measurement Tools and Checklists

King, G., Servais, M., Currie, M., Kertoy, M., Law, M., Rosenbaum, P., Specht, J., Willoughby, T., Forchuk, C., & Chalmers, H. (2003). The Community Impacts of Research Oriented Partnerships (The CIROP Measure). Available from www.impactmeasure.org.
 
CIROP Measure of Impact
 

King, G., Servais, M., Currie, M., Kertoy, M., Law, M., Rosenbaum, P., Specht, J., Willoughby, T., Forchuk, C., & Chalmers, H. (2003). The CIROP Respondent Form. Available from www.impactmeasure.org.
 
CIROP Respondent Form
 

King, G., Law, M., Forchuk, C., Willoughby, T., Rosenbaum, P., Kertoy, M., Chalmers, H., Specht, J., Currie, M., & Servais, M. (2003). The Research Contact Checklist (RCC). Available from www.impactmeasure.org.
 
Research Contact Checklist
 

King, G., Servais, M., Currie, M., Kertoy, M., Law, M., Rosenbaum, P., Specht, J., Willoughby, T., Forchuk, C., & Chalmers, H. (2003). Background Information Form for Research Partnerships (BIFRP). Available from www.impactmeasure.org.
 
Background Information Form for Research Partnerships

Models

Currie, M., King, G., Law, M., Rosenbaum, P., Kertoy, M., & Specht, J. (2003). A model of the types of community impacts of research partnerships. London, ON: Research Alliance for Children with Special Needs. Available from www.impactmeasure.org.
 
Animated Impact Model
 

King, G., Currie, M., & Servais, M. (2006). CIROP scales mapped onto the impact model: Showing recipient and research points of view. Available from www.impactmeasure.org. 
 
Animated Impact Model - Recipient Point Of View